Tag Archives: teresa meucci

Avital Cnaani – Fumitaka Kudo

Please join us at HSF by Montrasioarte for the opening of the twin shows featuring artists in residence,

Avital Cnaani (sculpture, Israel) and Fumitaka Kudo (drawing, Japan).

Curated by Raffaele Bedarida and Teresa Meucci, the show presents works achieved

by the two artists during their stay in New York (March – June 2010).

Opening reception:

June 3rd, 6.00-9.00 pm

By appointment:

June 4 – 24, 2010

HSF by Montrasioarte

128W 121st street

Subway 2, 3 to 116th street

http://www.harlemstudiony.org

646 542 9986

Avital Cnaani

STRANGLER FIG

Avital Cnaani explores a territory between body and geography

through works that merge the boundaries of drawing and sculpture.

Geographic and anatomic sites are evoked such as caves, mountains,

hair or ears, through metonymic and ambiguous allusions.

At HSF, she presents a series of drawings and three site-specific sculptures.

Her drawings are deeply plastic, tectonic. The fragile sculptures feel like spatial drawings

which link the architectural container of the exhibition-space’s walls and ceilings to the

contained space where you are standing and the air that you are breathing. Their link is

the bodily space of sensation stimulated through the use of a diversity of materials and textures.

Fumitaka Kudo

LIVING FOSSILS

When fish fossils found on mountains were believed to be

evidence for the Biblical Flood, Leonardo da Vinci proposed that

they were actually remains of organisms that had lived before

mountains were raised. A theory very close to that of modern paleontology.

During the last three months at HSF, Fumitaka Kudo drew a series of small and large scale

works on paper with the painstakingly technique of Leonardo’s drawings.

But his studies are visualizing with scientific precision large, impossible creatures, which could have

only swum in the depths of Flood’s waters. The intricate web of signs that compose the fish’s epidermis

is the product of a repetitive gesture and constitute a diagram of manual fatigue. The little, inexpressive eye is

the only opening through this crust.


io.

io_webinvitation

Please join us at HSF for the opening of io., the tenth group exhibition of artists-in-residence since the program’s foundation in 2007. io. presents works by: Doojin Ahn (Korea), Valerio Ricci (Italy), and Larissa Voltz (Germany-Israel).
Co-curated by HSF Chief Curator, Raffaele Bedarida with Junior Curator, Teresa Meucci, the show presents works achieved by the three artists during their stay in New York (August-November-2009).

IO.

DOOJIN AHN

VALERIO RICCI

LARISSA VOLTZ

Curated by: Raffaele Bedarida and Teresa Meucci

Opening reception:
November 2nd  6.00-9.00 pm

By appointment:
November 3 – 30, 2009

HSF by Montrasioarte
128W 121st street
Subway 2, 3 to 116th street

http://www.harlemstudiony.org

doojin

Doojin Ahn exhibits Just Caves, an installation consisting of a ring (circum. 239 inches) suspended at the center of a room. The exterior of the circle is covered with a painted frieze, depicting an uninterrupted series of caves. An archetype of wilderness, the cave is turned into an elementary narrative unit for a pre-human (or post-human) mythology. The deserted landscape is painted as visionary comics, but there is no narrative development in it. Deprived of the visual omnipotence given by a two-dimensional painting, the viewer uselessly walks around looking for an event to take place in the reverted panorama. Ahn is the first artist to participate in the HSF-Mongin Exchange Program, a collaboration between HSF and Mongin Art Space in Seoul.

 

valerio

Valerio Ricci’s Storage is an installation composed of 204 hand-made bricks, shaped, painted, and cooked by the artist during his three-month stay at HSF. They cover most of the floor’s surface in a room, leaving only a perimetric passageway free. Ordered in an extensive grid, their yellow-glazed ceramic shines as a carpet of gold bullions. Throughout the show, HSF visitors are invited to take home the bricks. Each brick is initialed, dated and numbered on the bottom; each guest can have a brick by filling out a form with his/her contacts and the number of the brick. The artist will therefore be able to send out certificates of authenticity; the owners will become part of a virtual community that would potentially re-unite the pieces. The progressive dismantling of Storage will be documented by a video. The work reverts historical minimalist and participation art practices, and reflects on the paradigmatic artisanal-alchemic nature of art making: it creates a paradoxical short-circuit between the value of things and that of experience, investments of time and real estate. Where will you put a glazed brick (it’s free!) in your mini New York apt.?

lara

Larissa Voltz works on language, expressions, their resonances with different architectural spaces and human environments, and the potentials of their multi-layered meanings. At io., she exhibits two paintings, Je te dérange? 1 and Je te dérange? 2. Their large size (85.4 x 129.5 inches), designed to fill the wall surface of the exhibition space, gives these works on paper a mural-like power to dialogue with HSF non-neutral architecture. More than a dialogue it is actually a clash. The sober, monumental letters of a lapidary text is surrounded by century-old wooden decorations and stucco works. “Am I disturbing you?”, the text repeats several times in French from the two sides of the room (Voltz is German, she lives in Israel, and made this work in New York in the context of an institution where Italian is the second-most frequently spoken language): in Je te dérange? 2, the letters are painted with oil-based Blockprinting colors on black paper; facing it, the same words are traced in negative, where the masking film is cut. Voltz’s artisanal technique was traditionally used to paint texts for advertising and shop signs: cut by hand out of a masking film, the letters were then stenciled on a wall or board. In a room, the words are monumental and aggressive, and the industrial-like letters reveal their textured colors and beautiful vibrations.

(Raffaele Bedarida, New York, October 2009)

ABOUT US
Harlem Studio Fellowship is a privately funded, non-profit Residency Program for international artists founded in 2007 by Ruggero Montrasio and curated by Raffaele Bedarida.
Harlem Studio Fellowship is designed to encourage the creative, intellectual and personal growth of emerging visual artists. We invite two or three young artists every three months, providing them with housing and studio in a townhouse in the district of Harlem. Every residency ends with a group exhibition, displaying works and projects accomplished by each artist during his/her stay in New York In addition to this, a complete show of the artists in residence will be held at the end of the first 3 years, displaying a selection from the works produced at HSF.


LOVISA RINGBORG – ELENA ASCARI

Please join us at HSF for the opening of a double solo exhibition of artists-in-residence, Lovisa Ringborg and Elena Ascari. Co-curated by HSF Chief Curator, Raffaele Bedarida with newly appointed Junior Curator, Teresa Meucci, the show presents works achieved by the two artists during their stay in New York (May-July-2009).

– LOVISA RINGBORG
if your secret was an animal
what animal would it be

– ELENA ASCARI
Cells

Curated by: Raffaele Bedarida and Teresa Meucci

Opening reception:
July 16th 6.30-9.00 pm

By appointment:
July 17th-31st, 2009

HSF by Montrasioarte
128W 121st street
Subway 2, 3 to 116th street

insomnia-web

LOVISA RINGBORG
if your secret was an animal
what animal would it be

Swedish artist Lovisa Ringborg exhibits at HSF two interrelated works. A photograph, Insomnia is the visual and conceptual counterpart of an environmental piece, If Your Secret Was an Animal What Animal Would It Be, which consists of four photographs and a mirror text. More than doing photographs, Ringborg literally works with photography: her initial photographic shots, used as “raw material” (the artist’s words), are digitally altered and combined into carefully composed and theatrically staged images. As with Caravaggio (a rough mattress hardly visible under classical draperies), the fictionality of the represented scene is revealed in her work, and the masquerade in the artist’s studio emerges interfering with the subject matter. Subtle visual inconsistencies insinuate unreliability in the faux staged-photographs and add surreal echoes to their content. But there is no attempt on shocking effects: no juxtaposition of evidently incongruous images and meanings. If the sleep of Goya’s reason produced monsters, the inoffensive stuffed animals that Ringborg photographed at the Museum of Natural History, are turned into the elementary vocabulary of a potentially monstrous language. A language from which narrative is removed and humans, beasts, and objects are kept frozen on the threshold between familiar anxieties and uncanny premonitions. RB

cellule web

ELENA ASCARI
Cells

The series of paintings presented by Italian artist Elena Ascari starts a new phase in her visual research. Ascari’s previous canvases portrayed the reflecting world of the malls’ escalators through a photorealist technique. The shiny world of glasses and mirrors was turned into a no-less-kitschy surface of gummy paint. The effect was one of complex visual fragmentation: repetitions, reflections, and distortions of the same figures resulted in an optical multiplication that could be read as an open sequence, a deconstructed story. With Cells, Ascari does a step further. Focused on the refracting skin of design objects, these new reflections destroy any perceptive continuity. An ordinary experience given by the popularization and domestication of Deconstructivist architecture is translated into a trope: close-up views become miniaturized oneiric visions. In the resulting kaleidoscope, humans as well as any other recognizable thing are fugacious and isolated apparitions. The story no longer exists, connections are lost. The aesthetic of very small reflective surfaces become, with Cells, a metaphor for the connective isolation of the i-phone era. RB